You don’t have to drive to Silicon Valley if you’re already there


Santa Cruz broadband policy keeps business in town, Silicon Valley leaders say.

Smart application of good broadband development policy helps local economies grow by attracting new businesses and helping existing ones grow. The place to look for it is Santa Cruz County, according to the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. It’s an example that Silicon Valley sorely needs.

The group, which was founded in 1978 by David Packard and represents about 400 of Silicon Valley’s heaviest corporate hitters, announced it was giving its “Turning Red Tape into Red Carpet” award to Santa Cruz County, and supervisor Zach Friend in particular, recognising his effort over the past year and a half to simplify the rules for planting broadband infrastructure in public roads and placing it on county property.

He was supposed to receive it at a ceremony last week, but it was cancelled by heavy rain. On the balance, that was probably a plus – we need water right now as much as broadband. But unlike water, broadband never falls from the sky. It has to be built and local governments can make it easy or hard to do. Silicon Valley’s leaders think Santa Cruz County is making it particularly easy.

“The award recognizes economic development initiatives that focus on retaining and growing existing businesses within the community or region”, according to the SLVG press release announcing that Santa Cruz won its the business retention and expansion award. It’s one of six categories on the annual honors list.

Real estate developments, environmental programs and a new U.S. patent office in Silicon Valley were also recognised, along with another broadband initiative, San Jose’s public WiFi system, also known as the Wickedly Fast Connected Experience.

It’s the second accolade in as many months: the California Broadband Council just posted drafts of Santa Cruz County’s broadband policy as examples for the rest of the state. The initiative isn’t complete, though. The Santa Cruz County board of supervisors approved the policies in concept back in January, but county staff are still chewing on the details. Expect something final and, hopefully, comprehensive early next year.

Posted in Uncategorized Tagged with: ,

Recent posts

\n\nThe long list of reforms planned for the California Public Utilities Commission by governor Jerry Brown and a trio of lawmakers will make proceeding...
\n\nA plan for a major overhaul of the California Public Utilities Commission was announced yesterday by governor Jerry Brown and three legislators – ...
\n\nWebpass\' fight with AT&T over access to conduit continues. That\'s the word from a Kind Reader of this humble blog who seems to be in a position ...
Splice case in AT&T manhole, click for the big picture.\n\nTelephone companies and other regulated utilities have to share conduit and pole access. ...
Don\'t have to look far to find a horse in Sacramento.\n\nA proposal to allow mobile carriers to install cell sites pretty much anywhere they want – in...
Camouflaged with associated equipment. Can\'t get any smaller than that.\n\nUsing a legislative maneuver delicately referred to as gut and amend, assembl...
Broadband infrastructure.\n\nIn a unanimous vote on Tuesday, the California senate\'s transportation and housing committee approved assembly bill 1549, a...
It\'s all about customer perception.\n\nCall it two and a half out of three. That was the vote by a panel of federal appeals court judges as they tossed ...
Click for the big, ugly picture.\n\nDon\'t believe the broadband speed levels that mobile carriers – AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon – claim t...
No less deserving.\n\nWhen it approved a $16 million grant for the Bright Fiber fiber-to-the-home project in Nevada County last year, the California Pub...

Activity

Tweets

Check you Internet Connection Speed

Speedtest.net Mini requires at least version 8 of Flash. Please update your client.